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Why You Should Take Advantage of Firefox Send

By Jonathan Heitz

What is Firefox Send?

Firefox send is a new service from Mozilla that allows anyone to share files with the click of a button. You can share files up to 1GB in size if you decide not to sign in to a Mozilla account. If you sign in, you can send files up to 2.5GB.

How do I access Firefox Send?

It’s easy! To access Firefox Send, simply go to send.firefox.com on your web browser. Once you’re there, you can upload a file, and then you’ll get a link which you can share to friends or coworkers.

There you go! We hope you take advantage of this convenient new free service from Mozilla. it’s perfect if you do not have access to your email or cloud storage service. Check it out!

Posted in: E-mail, Mobile Computing, Tech Tips for Business Owners

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11 Gmail Tips That Will Save You Time

While you may have been using Gmail for years, there’s a good chance you aren’t aware of all of the new time-saving features. Follow our 11 tips and you’ll find yourself spending a lot less time on email.

1. Choose your Inbox style

One of the best things about Gmail is how easily you can organize. The easiest way is to enable all of the tabs: Primary, Social, Promotions and Updates. Google will attempt to sort your email for you, but you can always drag and drop an email to a tab and Gmail will remember going forward. 

In addition to tabs, you can choose to organize your inbox so you see “Important first,” “Unread first,” Starred first,” or Priority first.” 

For “Important emails, Gmail will attempt to flag anything it thinks is important, but you can also step in to unflag messages that aren’t important or flag ones that are. You’ll find that Gmail gets better over time. When you’re in a hurry, you can just look at the “Important” folder.

For starred emails, it’s primarily a manual process. As an email comes in, you can star it. The default is a yellow star, but you can enable up to 12 different “stars.” Just go to Settings > General and then scroll down to stars. You can drag and drop the ones you want to use from the “Not in use” section into the “In use” section. Just remember to scroll all the way to the bottom to save your changes.

The Priority Inbox shows you your “Important,” “Starred,” and “Unread” emails. 

2. Label absolutely everything

Instead of folders, Gmail uses labels. Each email can have as many labels as you’d like, which can determine what shows up in your inbox or help you find things later.

One of the best uses of labels is for automatically storing email that you don’t want showing up in your Inbox. Right click on the email sender and select “Find emails from _____” When the search results show up, click the downward pointing triangle in the search bar.

In the box that open, select “Create Filter.”

Using the filter you can then “Skip the Inbox” and send the email to a labeled folder. This is great for emails that aren’t very time sensitive, but that you may want to read later.

Any search can become a filter — just type in a search and then click the arrow on the right-hand side of the search box to create a filter based on your search.

On the web, you can set up labels in Settings > Labels or do it directly from an email by clicking the label button above the email and typing a new label name. (The same buttons also let you apply existing labels to emails.) In the Gmail app, click the more button in the upper right, then select change labels

3. Find exactly what you want with search

Searching in Gmail is just as easy as searching with Google. All you have to do is click the search box at the top of the screen and type whatever you’re looking for.

But just like with Google, there are ways you can improve your searches to get the email you want more quickly. A tap on the arrow on the right-hand side of the search box pulls up advanced search options, letting you search on who the email is to or from, as well as words it has or doesn’t have. You can even narrow down the date range, selecting particular dates to search around. (This is also where you create filters that can automatically apply labels to your incoming email.)

If you prefer to type, these search options (and a lot more) can be done with a few keystrokes, too — plus, as we’ve already mentioned, typing can be quicker than clicking. Searching for “from:jack” will pull up emails from Jack.  Searching “subject:dinner” will pull up emails with “dinner” in the subject field. Review this list of search operators that work in Gmail to make the most of your searches.

4. Preview and respond to an email without opening it

The standard Gmail view isn’t exactly great for multitasking. After all, when you click on an email, it takes you to the message, but you can’t see any of the other messages in your inbox. The preview pane view takes your email game to a whole other level. To turn it on, click on the downward arrow to the left of the Settings cog. You can choose from “Vertical Split” and “Horizontal Split.” It makes it much easier to digest all of the info in your inbox and you even reply without opening the emails.

5. Use Smart replies and autofill

Gmail tries to anticipate what you’re doing to type and suggests it for you as you write. So if you’re replying to a message sent by Suzanne, you’ll see “Suzanne” pop up in grayed out letters after you type “Hi.” To accept Gmail’s suggestion, you just hit the Tab key.

Another way Gmail is helping is through Smart replies, suggested email responses that you can add with just a couple of clicks. Smart replies offer three options that are generated based on the email content: just click the option you want at the bottom of an email and hit send. You can also customize your message by editing it. This is a really fast way to fire off short email replies — and Gmail’s automatically generated responses are better than you might think.

6. Snooze emails that you need read or reply to later

If you want an email to reappear at the top of your Inbox, you can choose to “Snooze” it. To Snooze, move your mouse over the email and you’ll see four options pop up (from the left): Archive (the box with the down arrow), Trash, Mark as Unread and Snooze. You can also Snooze with the Gmail app by opening the email and selecting the top menu (the top set of three dots).

You can also turn on reminders to 

7. Get things done faster with keyboard shortcuts

When you’re at your computer, navigating applications by pointing and clicking takes time, but sometimes a simple keypress can do the same thing. It might not seem like it shaves a lot of time off your daily emailing, but those seconds add up.

First, you’ll have to turn on keyboard shortcuts by clicking settings in the upper right of the Gmail window, scrolling down to the keyboard shortcuts section, clicking keyboard shortcuts on, and then clicking save changes at the bottom of the screen. Then review Gmail’s keyboard shortcuts and start typing rather than clicking.

8. Make Gmail work with Dropbox, DocuSign, Google Calendar and more

One the computer version of Gmail, you’ll find a narrow window to the right of your Inbox. There, you can run your Calendar, Tasks, Google Keep and a variety of other programs. Most of the programs are business oriented, including Dropbox, DocuSign, Any.do and Trello. When you want to use on of the programs, you click on the inco and a wider window opens for use. 

9. Don’t waste time on annoying email and spam

Getting bombarded with email spam can be a huge nuisance, and Gmail has a lot of tools to help you get rid of spam for good. The biggest help is Google’s automatic spam filters, which files suspected spam messages under a spam label so they never show up in your inbox. (If you suspect emails are getting mislabeled as spam, click “more” in the lower left of your inbox and the spam label. If you see anything that isn’t spam, open the email and click “not spam” above the email.) If any spam messages do get through, click the exclamation mark button above the email to report it as spam — emails like that shouldn’t show up in your inbox anymore.

If a specific person is bothering you, you can also simply block them. Just open up an email from the person you don’t want to hear from, click on the arrow to the left of the reply button, and select “block.” You’ll never see another email from them.

And for the equally annoying, reply-to-all email threads that never seem to end, Gmail lets you mute them. Just click on the box to select the email and select More > Mute. The conversation will vanish from your inbox — and won’t reappear no matter how many replies it gets. However, you can still find it with by searching or, if you’ve labeled it, under a label if you need to.

Whether you intentionally create a new account or simply give a retailer your email address when you buy something, chances are you’re going to be stuck on a mailing list. And those mailing lists can fill your mailbox up fast.

While most mailing lists will have an unsubscribe option hidden somewhere in the bottom — that usually requires you to fill out a form — Gmail can make It faster. For most mailing lists messages, you’ll find an “unsubscribe” option to the right of the sender’s email address at the top of the message. One click and you’re done.

10. Send a canned response

If you frequently have to send the same email over and over again, a canned response can keep your wrists from the unnecessary copy-and-paste strain. Go to the gear, Settings, then the Labs tab. Then enable “Canned Response.” To create your own, Compose a new email, then click the downward arrow at the bottom right corner of the message box. Click “Canned Responses” and then enter its name. Write the email and send it. Then, whenever you create a new email, that particular response will be ready to go.

11. Fix your email errors

Have you ever clicked “send” on an email only to immediately remember you’ve forgotten something or made a terrible typo? Gmail has an undo send function that gives you a short window to change your mind after you’ve sent a message to take it undo the action. The notification pops up in the lower left corner of your Gmail menu after you send an email. Go to Settings and scroll down to “Undo Send” to chose a cancellation period (between 5 and 30 seconds), and then click save at the bottom of the page. 

Kantra, Suzanne. “11 Gmail Tips that Will Save You Time” Techlicious March 5, 2019 Time Savers, Tips & How To’s

Posted in: E-mail

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How to Make Sure Important Emails Stay Out of Your Spam Folder

 The algorithms guarding our inboxes have not developed to the stage that spam is usually kept at bay, but these auto-sorting processes aren’t perfect yet–if you’re not regularly opening up your spam folder to check on your email provider’s accuracy, you could well be missing some genuinely useful messages that you need to see.

While we can’t speak for everyone and every email app, we’ve noticed the occasional non-spam message get pulled into the spam pile. It’s still worth opening up your spam folder once in a while to check (spam is typically kept around for a few days before being automatically deleted).

We also recommend spending some time training the spam filter on your email client of choice, taking a few moments to help it fine-tune the techniques that help it spot spam messages from the rest. Here’s a guide through the process for some of the most popular email tools out there.


Gmail

To see the spam that’s collecting in the Gmail spam folder, you can follow this link in your web browser (remember the list of messages may well stretch to more than one page). If you see something genuine, open the message then click Report not spam.

Any messages that are really spam can be permanently erased by clicking Delete forever. Both these options appear on the main spam folder view too, so you can select and process batches of emails together if you need to.

Spam emails can be flagged from Gmail as well: Either select the message and click Spam, or go into it and click Spam. Gmail uses all this information to improve its spam-recognizing technologies and to try and ensure fewer mistakes in the future.

All of this can be done through the mobile apps as well. Tap the menu button then Spam to check on flagged messages: Once in a message, tap Not spam if Gmail got it wrong, or the trash can icon above if Gmail got it right.


Outlook or Windows Mail

If Microsoft Outlook software is in charge of your email life, you can start doing some email training by heading into the Junk Email folder from the left-hand navigation pane. If you spot a mistake, open the message then choose Junk and Not Junk from the Home tab of the ribbon menu.

For the opposite action, choose Junk and Block Sender, which will send any other messages from the same sender straight to your spam folder as well, in the future. Alternatively, you can pick MoveOther Folder, and select Junk Email from the list.

Outlook lets you change how aggressive the spam filter is inside the client: Open up the Junk menu from the Home tab, then choose Junk E-Mail Options. You can turn off filtering altogether, filter only the most obvious spam messages, try and catch as many spam messages as possible, or only accept emails from approved senders.

In the built-in Mail program for Windows 10, you need to click on More and then Junk in the folder list to find messages marked as spam. Use the Not junkbutton to tell Mail when an email is genuine. To send a message the other way, from the message window click the menu button (three dots, top right) then Mark as Spam.

On the web, you can alert Outlook to genuine messages with the This isn’t spam button in the message header, or flag unwanted emails with the Spamoption on the toolbar. In the mobile Outlook app, you need to open the menu button (three dots, top right), then choose either Move to spam or Move to inbox if Outlook has got something wrong.


Apple Mail

Those of you that favor Apple’s brand of email clients can use the Move selected messages to Junk or Move selected messages to Inbox buttons on the toolbar (next to the trash can) to train the filter on Mail for the Mac. You can also drag and drop emails in or out of the Junk folder.

For emails that are already in the spam (or junk) folder, there’s another option—you’ll see a Move to Inbox button at the top of the email when you open it. Whichever method you choose, Mail takes note for the future sorting of messages.

You do get a few options to play around with when it comes to which emails get flagged as spam and which don’t. Open the Mail menu, choose Preferences, then Junk Mail. The filter can be turned on and off, and you can set the types of messages that are exempt (like emails from people in your contacts list).

Junk email is filtered “based on what [Mail] learns from you when you mark email messages as junk or not junk and the settings in Junk Mail preferences,” Apple says. To reset all that learning, click Reset in the Junk Mail dialog window.

You don’t get any spam filtering settings to play around with on iOS, but you can move emails in and out of the junk folder if Mail isn’t getting it quite right. With a message open, tap the Move button (the folder icon) at the bottom to choose a different folder.


Add your own rules

Don’t forget that all the email providers and clients we’ve mentioned also come with filtering options and ways to set up rules—if you find that important messages from one particular sender are always getting spammed, for example, you can set up a rule that ensures they stay in the inbox.

You can also use this to flag up messages that have particular words in the subject or that come from a particular domain name, whether you want to flag important emails or spam emails that have been mislabeled.

In Gmail on the web, you can open up a message, click the menu button (three dots, top right), then choose Filter messages like this to get started. Just type a domain name (starting with “@”) into the From box to flag up all emails from that domain, for instance.

In Outlook, open the Home tab on the ribbon menu and choose Rules: You’ll get some suggested filtering options straight away, based on the message that’s currently selected, but to set more specific filters, choose the Manage Rules & Alerts option.

On Apple Mail for the desktop, meanwhile, you can open up the Mail menu then choose Preferences and Rules to start configuring some of your own custom-made filters. Anything from words in the subject header to whether or not a contact has emailed you before can be used as a criteria.

Nield, David. “How to Make Sure Important Emails Stay Out of Your Spam Folder” Gizmodo.com March 3, 2019

Posted in: E-mail, Tech Tips for Business Owners

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How to Easily Clean up Your Mailbox in Outlook

Outlook’s integrated Clean Up tool removes messages from your email folders that you no longer need.

Remove redundant messages from your Inbox (or any other email folder), select Home>Clean Up

1. On the Home tab, in the Delete group, click Clean Up.
2. Click one of the following:

• Clean Up Conversation – The current Conversation is reviewed, and redundant messages are deleted.
• Clean Up Folder – All Conversations in the selected folder are reviewed, and redundant messages are deleted.
• Clean Up Folder & Subfolders – All Conversations in the selected folder and any folder that it contains are reviewed, and redundant messages are deleted.

Change Conversation Clean Up Options:
1. Click the File tab.
2. Click Options.
3. Click Mail.
4. Under Conversation Clean Up do any of the following:

• You can change the folder where items are moved, for Cleaned-up items will go to this folder, click Browse, and then select an Outlook folder. By default, messages are moved to the Deleted Items folder. If you have multiple email accounts in your Outlook profile, each account has its own Deleted Items folder. Messages are moved to the Deleted Items folder that corresponds to the email account.

• Note: This option is not available if the destination is Deleted Items folder: To replicate the folder structure of items Clean Up deletes (when you use the Clean Up Folders & Subfolders command), select When cleaning sub-folders, recreate the folder hierarchy in the destination folder.

Posted in: E-mail, MS Office Tips and Tricks

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Forget Passwords! It’s Time for Passphrases!

 Mr. Henry Williams is a deputy editor for The Wall Street Journal in New York, and he reported on something we just also recommended. Here is an excerpt with a link to the full article at the end. You should forward this to your C-suite:

Two researchers say they have come up with a system that makes passphrases more secure and practical.

We all know the drill: When signing up at a website, you’re told to choose a password. It has to be at least a certain number of characters. It must contain letters and at least one number and perhaps at least one special character. Oh, but some special characters aren’t acceptable.

The death of complicated passwords—which are both hard to remember and not that secure—has been forecast for years, but reality hasn’t quite caught up yet.

Now, however, two researchers have developed an idea for replacing passwords with more-secure passphrases that people will actually remember and use.

Kevin Juang, a former doctoral student at Clemson University, and his co-author and adviser, Joel Greenstein, have created a working prototype of an online system for websites and their registered users to replace passwords with randomly generated passphrases that in theory, in combination with other cues, will be much easier to remember and to enter accurately.

Passphrases have been discussed in online-security research for over 30 years, but most websites and apps still use passwords. Partly, that’s because long passphrases are harder to type, leading to more log-in failures, but it’s also because users tend to pick phrases from common sources, likes song lyrics, making them easy for hackers to figure out. People also sometimes use a passphrase on more than one website, or use a certain word repeatedly to make the passphrase even easier to remember.

Williams, Henry. “Forget Passwords. It’s time for Passphrases” The Wall Street Journal. 2018 September

Wall Street Journal Article: “Forget Passwords It’s time for Passwords”


This is only one aspect of our layered security strategy that our cybersecurity team has been recommending to our customers. To see how fast any of your complex passwords can be cracked, go to www.passfault.com.

A good place to start is to see if your employees credentials (email and password combinations) are on the Dark Web.

Right now, we are offering a complementary Dark Web Scan for your business’s email domain. This report will immediately reveal if you or any of your employees have been compromised within the last 36 months.

If nothing turns up, you’ll have peace of mind and you can take preventative actions to make sure it stays that way. On the other hand, if the report reveals a compromise, you are in the best position to take the next logical step towards protecting your business!

You can always contact us at CyberSecurity@Trinityww.com or by calling (732) 780-8615 if you have any questions about what you can be doing to put your business in the best position to avoid a cyber security breach

Posted in: E-mail, IT Support, Security, Tech Tips for Business Owners

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6 New Gmail Features Worth Trying — and how to get them now

On the surface, you could easily mistake the new Gmail for the same web-based email you’ve been using for years.

But looks can be deceiving. This week’s major revamp packs in powerful, helpful and overdue new features. It’s the right balance of new and familiar.

If you haven’t gotten a notification to test out the new Gmail, you can be proactive.

Click the gear icon in the top right corner of the web-version of the platform. Select “Try the new Gmail” and poof, you have a refreshed inbox. (If you don’t see the option, check again soon).

 

1. Make your emails self-destruct in 5…4…3…

The star feature of the redesign is Confidential Mode. If you’re sending sensitive information or are worried about sappy love letters haunting you a few years from now, you can pick a day when you want those emails to disappear. The recipient won’t have access to those emails anymore either — unless they took some screenshots.

Click the lock icon in the bottom right corner of any email you’re composing. A pop-up window will give you the option to pick when it expires, from one day to five years. If you know the recipient’s phone number, you can add an extra layer of security by requiring them to enter an SMS passcode to read your message.

2. Unsend a message

You can take back access to emails sent in confidential mode anytime before they are set to expire. Go into your sent folder, find the message, and click “remove access.” If you change your mind or if it expired too soon, click “renew access.”

Note: The recipient will still see that you sent them an email, including the subject line, but if they try to click it, they’ll be told “You don’t have access to this email.”

3. Make more room for your inbox

This tiny tweak is hiding in plain sight. Google has added the ability to collapse the left navigation bar to make more room for your list of unread emails. Tap the menu icon in the top left corner (a stack of three lines), next to the Google logo and it will disappear.

4. Don’t open your emails

It’s the ultimate productivity tip: instead of opening your emails, don’t open them. If you hover over a message in your inbox, four icons will appear. You can archive an email, trash it, mark it as read or unread, or snooze it, all without opening it. If you select snooze, you can choose a certain day or time to be reminded of its existence — or select the mysterious “someday” option.

Bonus: You don’t need to open an email to see its attachments. They now appear as small icons in the main inbox view under each email, so you can quickly open them without digging through a chain of emails.

5. Let Google answer for you

When you can’t find the words, let Google answer for you. Gmail’s new Smart Reply feature scans incoming email and suggests three possible replies for simple enough conversations. For example, if a friend emails to ask if you have any pepper jack cheese for a picnic, Gmail might suggest “I do!” “I do indeed” or “No, I do not.” You can edit or add to the text before hitting send.

Google has been working on its Smart Reply feature for years, starting with the Inbox app in 2015. The feature is also available in Gmail’s Android and iOS apps.

6. Stay on task with a brand new app

There’s a new sidebar on the right side of Gmail that shows a mini version of your Google Calendar, Tasks and other apps. If you use the Tasks list for keeping track of what you need to do, check out Google’s new standalone Tasks mobile app. You can create simple lists with radio buttons to tap when you complete something. These items will automatically sync between the app and Gmail.

Kelly, Heather. “ 6 new Gmail features worth trying — and how to get them now”

 

Posted in: E-mail, Tech Tips for Business Owners

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4 Ways to Control Outgoing Email in Outlook

Outlook doesn’t have to control when your messages go out. Take charge and send emails when you want.
Out of the box, Outlook sends emails immediately, which probably isn’t a great idea for most of us. There are many reasons not to send email immediately, but here are a few:

  • Allowing an email to sit for a few hours, or even a few minutes, gives you a chance to review the content with (sort of) fresh eyes. You’ll catch errors you didn’t catch before.
  • Some conversations go back and forth too quickly, so you might respond before you have all the information or ask questions that the next message answers. Slow down and avoid playing email tag.
  • It’s easy to fire off an angry response in the middle of a heated discussion. Give yourself some time to cool off. Most likely, you won’t send an angry message at all.

That last one has saved me more than once—I have a hot temper (but I’d like that to remain a secret). I’ve never had a knee-jerk reaction serve me well. Never.

If you’d like to take control and decide when messages go out, you can. In this article, I’ll show you how to manually send messages or schedule messages to delay the sending.

I’m using Outlook 2016 (desktop) on a Windows 10 64-bit system. Most of these tips will work in earlier versions, but the route to the options might be significantly different. There’s no demonstration file for these techniques, and they don’t apply to 365 Mail.

1: Disable the default

As I mentioned, Outlook sends email immediately. The easiest way to determine when email goes out is to send it yourself, but you must disable this feature first:

  1. Click the File tab, choose Options, and then choose Advanced in the left pane. In the Send And Receive section, click Send/Receive or press Ctrl+Alt+S.
  2. In the resulting dialog, uncheck the three options under Setting for Group “All Accounts” (Figure A). You could also select individual groups, if they exist.
  3. Click Close and the click OK.

Outlook won’t automatically send email once you uncheck these options.

The options might need a bit of explanation. The first and third options allow you to customize your send tasks a bit.If you want to continue to use F9 to send messages, don’t uncheck the first option. Uncheck the third option if you do not want to send messages when exiting Outlook. Definitely uncheck the second option to disable automated send tasks—that’s what you’re trying to do!

By default, Outlook includes all accounts in the All Accounts group; you won’t see individual accounts listed. So, it’s an all-or-nothing option as is. If you want to remove accounts from the group, click the Edit button. Doing so allows you to leave the automated default setting in tact for only those accounts that remain in the group. Any account you remove will need your manual attention. Then you can create new groups and change those options as needed—or not.

You might notice that you still receive mail. For better or worse, you might not be able to control your server. Most likely, nothing is wrong. If you can’t control where your email sits until you download it, you might have to live with this inconsistency.

With this feature disabled, use the options in the Send & Receive group on the Send/Receive tab to control when messages go out. If you want a bit of control, check out the dropdown options for the Send/Receive Groups. Using these options, you can send mail for one account or all accounts.

2: Delay all outgoing mail

Outlook routes outgoing messages through the Outbox. Once there, by default, it immediately sends the message. Disabling the automated send feature might be too much control; after all, you must remember to send the mail. Whether you’re forgetful or interrupted by meetings, phone calls, and so on, this option might not work best for you.

If you don’t want to disable the automated send feature but you’d like a little bit of a delay, you can set a rule on outgoing messages in the Outbox. While messages are waiting in the Outbox, you can edit or even delete them. To set up a rule that delays all outgoing mail, follow these steps:

  1. Click the File tab and double-click Manage Rules & Alerts. Or choose Manage Rules & Alerts from the rules dropdown in the Move group on the Home tab (in Mail).
  2. In the resulting dialog, click New Rule.
  3. In the Start From A Blank Rule section, select Apply Rule On Messages I Send (Figure B) and click Next.
  4. In the following wizard pane, don’t check any options; the lower pane will display Apply This Rule After I Send The Message. Click OK without changing anything. When Outlook asks you to confirm that the rule will be applied to every message, click Yes.
  5. In the next pane, check the Defer Delivery By A Number Of Minutes option.
  6. In the lower pane, click the Number Of Minutes link, enter the number of minutes (Figure C), and click OK. The link will now display the number of minutes you entered. Click Next.
  7. At this point, you can check exceptions, or not. For instance, you might want to bypass the delay if you’ve marked a message as Important. For this example, don’t check any exceptions. Click Next without changing anything.
  8. In the final window, give the rule a name, such as 10-minute delay. If necessary, check the Turn On This Rule option. You can also select Create This Rule On All Accounts, if that’s your intention. Click Finish and then click OK when you’re ready to create the rule.

Launch the Rules wizard.


Enter the number of minutes you want to delay each message.

If you edit a message while it’s in the Outbox, Outlook doesn’t reset the timer. It’s possible that you might decide to rescind the delay, and fortunately, Outlook has an option to do so:

  1. Open the delayed message (you’ll find it in the Outbox).
  2. Click the Options tab.
  3. Click the Delay Delivery option.
  4. In the resulting dialog, uncheck the Do Not Deliver Before option (Figure D).
  5. Click OK.

You can change your mind and send a delayed message at any time.

It’s counterproductive to disable the automated send feature (#1) and set a delay rule. Outlook ignores scheduled delays if you’ve disabled the automated send feature.

3: Delay a single message

If disabling the automated feature or delaying all messages is overkill, you can always delay individual messages, as needed. Fortunately, the process if easy and flexible. To delay an individual message, do the following:

  1. Click the Options tab in the new message window.
  2. In the More Options group, click Delay Delivery.
  3. In the Delivery Options section, set the date and time Outlook should send the message. The default settings (shown earlier in Figure D) are for 5:00pm on the current day, and I don’t know of anyway to change this default setting.

If you decide to send the message before the scheduled time, simply uncheck the Do Not Deliver Before option.

4: Send after connecting

If you leave messages in the Inbox when you exit Outbox, Outlook can send them when you next launch, if you like:

  1. Click the File tab, choose Options, and click Advanced.
  2. In the Send And Receive section, check the Send Immediately When Connected option (Figure E).
  3. Click OK.
Send when launching Outlook.

This option isn’t a catch-all for forgotten messages. If you’ve disabled the automated send feature, it won’t work even if you select it. If the scheduled time for a delayed message hasn’t arrived, this option won’t send that message. This option doesn’t add much to the mix.

Additional insight

You can do everything right and not get the desired results; your expectations probably don’t fall in line with Outlook’s reality. If you disable Outlook’s ability to send messages waiting in the Outbox, you may or may not receive a prompt to remind you when you exit. It depends on cache settings and even an add-in can usurp this option. In addition, Outlook doesn’t send messages when closed, regardless of what you might have scheduled. Anything sitting in your Outbox when you exit will still be there the next time you launch Outlook. If a scheduled send time has lapsed, Outlook will attempt to send the messages upon launching. Don’t schedule send tasks if you’ve disabled the automated send feature; these two features don’t work together.

If you schedule messages and you’re sure that the automated feature is enabled, but Outlook never sends the scheduled messages, talk with your administrator. If you don’t have one, it’s possible that an add-in is interfering. Disable all add-ins and see if the scheduling feature starts working for you. If it does, enable the add-ins one at a time until you find the culprit.

Harkins, Susan. “Four ways to control outgoing email in Outlook” TechRepublic, MS Office, January 28, 2018

Posted in: E-mail, MS Office Tips and Tricks

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Unsubscribing from Spam Only Makes It Worse

The last time I checked my spam folder, I noticed a few messages included an unsubscribe link. Well that’s nice, I thought. Maybe spammers realize that some people will never respond, so they want to trim their lists for efficiency. I clicked “unsubscribe.” That was a mistake.

While “legit companies” honor unsubscribe requests, says the McAfee Labs blog, “shady” ones just use the unsubscribe buttons to confirm your address and send you more spam. Sophos blogger Alan Zeichick says that clicking unsubscribe tells the spammer you opened their email, possibly because you were interested or suspected it was real. By visiting the spammer’s fake unsubscribe page, you’re giving them your browser info and IP address, and even opening yourself up to malware attacks.

If an email looks like truly shady spam (and not just a newsletter you’re sick of reading), don’t click any links. Just mark it as spam and move on.

Douglas, Nick. “Unsubscribing from Spam Only Makes It Worse” Lifehacker June 2017

Posted in: E-mail, Security

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7 Dangerous Subject Lines

Email attacks are the most common methods for initiating ransomware and phishing scams. Attackers want you to open an infected attachment or click a malicious link, and unwittingly download malware to your machine. But you can avoid such attacks by being patient, checking email addresses, and being cautious of sketchy-sounding subject lines.

2 out of 5 people open emails from unknown senders!

7 dangerous subject lines to watch for

Cybercriminals initiate their attacks through hyperlinks or attachments within emails. Most of these attacks use urgency or take advantage of user trust and curiosity to entice victims to click. Here are examples of subject lines to be cautious of.

Remember me? It’s Tim Timmerson from Sunnytown High! Criminals use social engineering tactics to find out the names of the people close to you. They may also hack a friend or relative’s email account and use their contact lists as ammo. Next, they research and impersonate someone you know, or used to know, through chats and emails. Not quite sure about a message you received? Hover your mouse over the sender address (without clicking) to see who the real sender is.

Online Banking Alert: Your Account will be Deactivated. Imagine the sense of urgency this type of subject line might create. In your panicked rush to find out what’s going on with your account, you might not look too closely at the sender and the URL they want you to visit. At the end of March, a Bank of America email scam just like this was successfully making the rounds. Initially, the email looked completely legitimate and explained politely that a routine server upgrade had locked the recipient out of their account. At this point, when clicking the link to update their account details, an unsuspecting victim would be handing their login credentials and banking information over to cybercriminals.

USPS: Failed Package Delivery. Be wary of emails saying you missed a package, especially if they have Microsoft Word documents attached. These attacks use the attachments to execute ransomware payloads through macros. Senior Threat Research Analyst Tyler Moffitt walks us through what it’s like to get hit with a ransomware payload from a USPS phishing email.

United States District Court: Subpoena in a civil case. Another common phishing attack imitates government entities and may try to tell you that you’re being subpoenaed. The details and court date are, of course, in the attachment, which will deliver malware.

CAMPUS SECURITY NOTIFICATION: Phishing attacks have been targeting college students and imitating official university emails. Last month, officials at The University of North Carolina learned of an attack on their students that included a notification email stating there was a security situation. The emails were coming from a non-uncg.edu address and instructed users to “follow protocols outlined in the hyperlink”. Afterward, the attacker would ask victims to reset their password and collect their sensitive information.

Ready for your beach vacay? Vacation scams offer great deals or even free airfare if you book RIGHT NOW. These scams are usually accompanied by overpriced hotel fees, hidden costs, timeshare pitches that usually don’t pan out, and even the theft of your credit card information. Check the legitimacy of offers by hovering over links to see the full domain, copy and pasting links into a notepad to take a closer look, and by researching the organization.

Update your direct deposit to receive your tax refund. The IRS warns of last minute email phishing scams that take advantage of everyone’s desire for hard-earned refunds and no doubt, their banking credentials.

Read between the lines

  1. Enable an email spam filter
  2. Hover over links before you click
  3. Keep your cybersecurity software up to date
  4. Disable macros to avoid ransomware payloads
  5. Ignore unsolicited emails and attachments
  6. Be on the lookout for the top 5 tax season scams
  7. Educate yourself on social engineering attacks
  8. Check the Federal Trade Commission’s scam alerts

Help us create awareness around scams and phishing attacks with dangerous subject lines. Education to adopt safer online habits should be top priority. So, share this blog with your colleagues.

Rush, Mike. “7 Dangerous Subject Line” Webroot, April 2017

Posted in: E-mail, Security

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Make Important Email Standout in Outlook

 

To make sure emails from important contacts stand out and do not go unnoticed, you can set up a rule that makes the email appear in a specific color or a specific size and type of font. For example, you can make emails from your boss appear in a larger font or have emails from family members all appear in red. To set up the way emails are displayed for Outlook 2016, Outlook 2010 and Outlook 2007:

For Outlook 2016:

  • Go to the View tab

  •  Select View Settings

 

  • Choose Conditional Formatting

 

  •  Click add
  • Name your rule
  • Click on Font and pick a color, style and size and click OK

 

  • Click on Condition

 

  • Type in the email address of the sender or senders you want to highlight. For multiple people, separate the email address with a semicolon.

 

For Outlook 2010:

  • Go to View tab

 

 

  • Select View Settings

 

  • Choose Conditional Formatting

 

  • Click Add
  • Name your rule
  • Click on Font and pick a color, style and size and click OK

 

  • Click on Condition

 

  • Type in the email address of the sender or senders you want to highlight. For multiple people, separate the email addresses with a semicolon.

 

For Outlook 2007:

  • Go to the tools menu

 

  • Select Organize, using colors

 

  • Then choose specific colors for emails from specific people

 

  • More advanced automatic settings for applying font type and size to emails can be added by selecting Automatic Formatting in the top right corner of the Using Colors screen.

 

  • Click “Add” to create more rules
  • When you’re finished creating your rule, important email will stand out.

 

 

Kantra, Suzanne. “Make Important Email Standout in Outlook with Color Coding” Techlicious February 2017

Posted in: E-mail, MS Office Tips and Tricks, Tech Tips for Business Owners

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