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Windows 7: What is Your Company’s Upgrade Strategy?

If your business is still running on Windows 7, it’s time to get serious about how you’re going to handle the January 14, 2020 end of support.

If this is the case, you have some important decisions to make, and not a lot of time remaining. Windows 7 support officially ends in less than a year, on January 14, 2020. After that date, Microsoft will stop delivering security updates automatically, and by then most third-party vendors will have dropped support as well.

Most businesses completed their planning for migration to Windows 10 long ago and are in the final stages of implementing that plan. If you’re still procrastinating, it’s time to get serious.​

You have a few options. Which one you choose depends on why your organization is still clinging to Windows 7. If the main reason is inertia, you’ll need to find something to motivate yourself. You could, for example, calculate the costs of cleaning up after a successful ransomware attack that spreads over your network, including the loss of business while you scramble to recover. If you’re in a regulated industry, you might want to find out whether running an unsupported operating system puts you at compliance risks, which can result in hefty fines and a loss of business when customers find out.

The other possible deployment blocker is a compatibility problem. For most Windows 7 apps, compatibility shouldn’t be an issue. If your business depends on specialized hardware or line-of-business software that absolutely will not run on Windows 10, you might be able to make a case for paying to extend the support deadline. But that just delays the inevitable by a year or two, or at most three. Your search for a replacement should be well under way by now.

So, what are your options?

BITE THE BULLET AND UPGRADE

If you don’t have any compatibility issues that need to be addressed first, the simplest and most straightforward route is to put together a deployment plan and begin executing it. But the details of tha plan matter, especially if you want to avoid the headaches of the “Windows as a service” model.

As always, of course, the easiest upgrade path is via hardware replacement. Any device that’s five years old or more is an obvious candidate for recycling. Devices that were designed for Windows 10 and then downgraded to Windows 7 should be excellent candidates for in-place upgrades, after first making sure that the systems have the most recent BIOS/UEFI firmware updates.

One not-so-obvious factor to consider is which Windows 10 edition to deploy. The obvious choice for most businesses is Windows 10 Pro, but I strongly suggest considering an additional upgrade to the Enterprise (or Education) edition.

Yes, machines running Windows 10 Pro allow your admins to defer feature updates, but the support schedule for Enterprise/Education is significantly longer: a full 30 months, as opposed to 18 months for Pro.

For most businesses, the Windows Enterprise E3 and E5 subscription options are probably the easiest and most cost-effective here.

DO NOTHING.

On January 25, 2020, Windows 7 won’t stop working. In fact, you’re unlikely to notice any changes. If you feel lucky, this is certainly an option. You might even consider the lack of monthly updates a welcome feature.

SPOILER ALERT: This s a very bad idea, one that exposes you to all manner of possible bad outcomes.

If you absolutely must keep one or more Windows 7 PCs in operation, perhaps because they’re running a critical app or controlling a piece of old but essential hardware, the best advice I can offer is to completely disconnect that machine from the network and lock it down so that it only runs that one irreplaceable app.

Bott, Ed. “Windows 7: What is your company’s exit strategy?” ZDNet, The Bott Report January 30, 2019


Time is very short!

Let us know if you are currently using Windows 7 and would like to know more about your options. We’ve developed a unique upgrade strategy for our clients and would be happy to share it with you.

If you are interested in knowing more about it, give us a call! 732.780.8615 or email us at support@trinityww.com

Posted in: Tech Tips for Business Owners

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